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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have been wanting to get a bed-liner for my 2002 Long Bed. It is a Wyoming truck with no rust in the bed except a few surface locations.

I am hopeful some of you might have researched this topic recently and could offer suggestions on Rhino vs Line-X or Dual Liner or even if you have found a DIY product with strong adhasion and abrasion resistance.

We had Line-X on the towers and platforms of our marine watercrafts and I liked the grip it offered over Rhino. I always keep a 5/8" sheet of plywood in the bed when I want to move anything that will gouge or if I am hauling anything I need to slide out easily such as feed sacks.

I think I recall seeing a chart that indicated the cheapest prices were down in TX so that might be a good excuse for a road trip.

Any suggestions appreciated.
 

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When I had my truck done I wanted a LineX liner but the local dealer had gone out of business. The only other dealer was a SpeedLiner which is similar to LineX but slightly thicker but not as thick as Rhino. In the 18 or so years since it has worn quite well.

As for a DIY one all I can say is that the prep work is what it is all about. Sanding the bed and getting it all clean will determine if it is a good job or not

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When I pulled my bed last year and replaced the support channels I also sprayed the inside with the T-Rex DIY Spray liner after re-assembly. I can’t speak highly enough of it. It was so easy. Kit comes with the gun. Details are in my post- not sure how to copy it w/photos but here is the post title, spray liner at the very end— title:

Starting new thread / pictures for bed removal, air bags, shocks, Hutch mod
 

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157089
157090
 

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As bugman said, I spent hours with a DA sander, wire wheel, sandpaper, wiped down with Acetone, and sprayed etching primer over the bare metal from my repairs before spraying the bed liner.
 

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Not to minimize what Big Horn did, but I think hiring the job out would be the way to go. The products themselves are the same with all vendors, a 2 part polyurea, and the thickness and texture is dependent on how it's applied. I had bedliner applied as the tread on fiberglass running boards with nice rough anti-skid texture, and they also applied it smooth to the underside as a rock impact barrier. I have no idea how they got the two different textures, but a qualified applier should be able to do whatever you want. My truck came with spray-in liner when I bought it new, and it's still in great shape, except where I gouged it with a shovel at one of the rear hold-down bolts. No worries - it's a truck! ;)
 

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I did find a great use for the DIY in a quart can. I lined my travel tool box with it. I got tired of water and dust getting into it. Now it stays nice and dry and clean

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Discussion Starter #8
I stopped by the local Line-X shop and the basic package (black & no UV) is $535 which includes the tailgate. The owner said the T-50 bed bolts often break while they are attempting removal. Any tricks you guys can suggest other than PBBlaster?

I still plan on looking at Rhino.

I may be getting a slide-in camper so I am mostly wanting to just get a protective coating on the bed.
 

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Unless you are planning on removing the bed I would just have them spray over the bolts and then deal with it later if you have to.

Other than that I would go buy some new bolts and replace them before the liner is sprayed in. Then they can take them out and put them back in with no problems. People usually break one or two when they try to remove them no matter what they spray on them. I even welded a piece of rebar onto a couple of bolts for a friend so that he could take them out. This was on a OBS where the bolts were carriage bolts and no way to grab them on the top.

As for a slide in camper and Rhino liner, I don't like it. My brother in law has a 97 Dodge that he had the Rhino liner sprayed in and he has had the liner repaired 3 times whenever he removes his camper. I should say that he has only had that camper out 3 times since he put it in back in 97. So unless Rhino liner has changed a lot I would go with LineX.
 

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With a slide-in camper, you'll want an anti-skid mat under it anyway, so bedliner doesn't really do anything for that.
Skid-Gard
 

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Kevin, that is the first that I have ever heard of that and I have had campers in my trucks for 40+ years now.

Even the dealers that I have purchased the campers from didn't even mention it.

But it is a good idea.
 

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From a lot of research, and my limited experience, I would be very surprised if you got “all” the bolts out without welding or removing the bolts heads, partially because of how the j-nuts, capture nuts, are made with interference. Thats the reason I and a lot of people have chased the threads with a tap- I chose to double nut them from underneath- probably an overkill........ but,

like we do to most of our heavy equipment at work and as I had new bolts, I smeared some silicone in the torx heads before painting and the bed liner application. Makes easy access digging out the silicone plug to fit the torx bit for removal.
 

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Kevin, that is the first that I have ever heard of that and I have had campers in my trucks for 40+ years now.

Even the dealers that I have purchased the campers from didn't even mention it.

But it is a good idea.
The one I have came with the previous camper I bought used. Maybe those dealers aren't that good at upselling you. ;)
 
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