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So last weekend was in the process of swapping all eight glow plugs. My truck was starting just fine but a little more white smoke than I liked. So when I got to the last glow plugs...it was hard turning all the way to the top, at least what I thought was the top. Once I got to the point that I thought all the treads were free I tried to remove the plug and all it did was wiggle and wouldn't budge. Is this a swollen glow plug or are the threads messed up. This glow plug right from the start had the internal electrode just hanging on the pigtail separated from the threaded portion of the glow plug but sitting inside. All the other glow plugs remove very easily with to evidence of swelling. I tried and tried to remove this last glowplug with no luck so I ended up just retightening back into the hole. My truck starts much easier with the seven new glow plugs but I would really like to get the last one also. Any ideas? Is it the threads or a swollen plug? Will a slide hammer remove it the rest of the way?
 

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Did the threaded steel exterior/body of the plug come out and leave the electrode in the hole? It's not really clear from what you wrote what happened.
 

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I've never encountered a stuck gp. Knowing how difficult it would be to remove a broken piece of a gp from the cylinder, I would say no to the slide hammer (or any other forceful means).

Use a carbon solvent: be patient and gentle, and don't start the project unless you have the time and where-with-all to carry it all the way through. Good luck.
 

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I had one back in march witch was hard to unscrew and when I removed it, the tip was broken and stayed in the head.

Results, took the engine off to remove the head and get the piece off


Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

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I've never encountered a stuck gp. Knowing how difficult it would be to remove a broken piece of a gp from the cylinder, I would say no to the slide hammer (or any other forceful means).

Use a carbon solvent: be patient and gentle, and don't start the project unless you have the time and where-with-all to carry it all the way through. Good luck.
What would you like to do, use a slide hammer and get the broken part out of the glow plug hole or pull the head?

If the slide hammer works you will save yourself the headaches that come from pulling the head. Carbon solvents don't always work the way that they are intended to work.
 

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Attempting the carbon solvent will work 90% of the time, however and working it away slowly lessens the chances of the tip breaking off in the cylinder. A slide hammer gorrilla'ing it out is almost a guaranteed broken tip.

I had one that took two days of soaking and slowly working it in and out to get it out. Working at it for five minutes at a time every few hours was sure a lot less work and expense than pulling a head. A pair of needle nose pliers was the only tool needed.

Quicksilver Power Tune, made by Mercury Marine is the best stuff I found for carbon dissolving. I found it at Bass Pro in the boat section.
 

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Quicksilver Power Tune, made by Mercury Marine is the best stuff I found for carbon dissolving. I found it at Bass Pro in the boat section.
I know that carbon is hard, abrasive, and a chunk of it can groove a cylinder wall. Carbon is a pretty basic element - does the Quicksilver product actually dissolve carbon?? and if so, into what?

Is it necessary to try to remove all the Quicksilver from the cylinder? Is it worth flushing the cylinder with - say - diesel fuel and a Mighty-Vac in order to remove as much of the Quicksilver/carbon as possible?
 

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About the slide hammer solution, I first read about it in a post that Dale Isley of Tymar fame posted years ago.
 

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Yes the Quicksilver does dissolve the carbon, hence the "carbon dissolver" used to describe it. Just like with any solvent the solid goes into solution in such small particles slowly sloughing off to eventually allow the swollen head to pass through the hole. It isn't some kind of liquid chisel breaking off chunks. Sorry can't tell you what the chemical makeup of it is once it's dissolved.

Turn the engine over a few rotations with the #9 fuse pulled and empty glowplug if you think you've sprayed enough to possibly hydrolock a cylinder.

bugman it doesn't matter who suggested the slide hammer. If you get carried away with it and decide it's a tool of brute force you can easily break what's left of the tip and leave a chunk either lodged in the head or floating around in the cylinder. That's all that I'm saying. If you choose to use a slide hammer it needs to be used judiciously.
 

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ive had a couple swell up on gm 6.2l and ive clamped on to them with a vise grip and prying against the vise grip and head had luck with that
 
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