The Diesel Stop banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
577 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I recently replaced my stock downpipe with 4". The previous owner drilled a hole in the factory downpipe and inserted the thermocouple into the downpipe and held in place with a band clamp, also with a hole through it.:nono:

I wanting to install it in the manifold, but I dont see how this one installs. There are no threads or adapters on any kind. Its about 2.5" long and the size of a pencil. The gauge is cheap Z series Autometer. How do I go about installing this in my manifold?

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,604 Posts
PRE turbo is much better

http://www.thedieselstop.com/forums/f25/pyro-gauge-213772/

Go to about the 12th post. there will be a picture of where it goes on a PSD engine. Once it is installed you want to keep the EGT's below 1150 if you can. Pistons melt at about 1240 and since the gauge might be a little off, better to err on the colder side...
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
18,870 Posts
As the photo in my previous post that Chuck linked to shows, use the same band clamp that was around the downpipe to clamp the thermocouple into a hole in the neck of the exhaust manifold. Yes, that means you have to drill a hole in the exhaust manifold, exactly the right size for the thermocouple to clamp into without flopping around.

Then 1,250° is the red line, so try to maintain about 1,200° when climbing a mountain pass with a heavy trailer. You control EGT with the pyrometer the same way you control speed with the speedometer. I.e., modulate the go pedal to keep it where you want it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
577 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I noticed in the picture he had what appears to be a white gasket of some type on his thermocouple. What is it...is it used for an extra seal?

Thanks
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
18,870 Posts
You should be able to use the exact parts you remove from the downpipe to install in the manifold. Yes, that includes a gasket of some sort to help seal around the base of the thermocouple. You see his because that gasket is big and white, but if it was small and black it would still be there but you wouldn't notice it as much.

I suspect your thermocouple also includes some sort of gasket at the base of the thermocouple, but it may not be big and white and stick out like a sore thumb.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
577 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I dont remember seeing one when I took it out of the downpipe. Is it made of anything special? If its missing, where could I pick one up?

Thanks
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
18,870 Posts
Is it made of anything special? If its missing, where could I pick one up?
It's special in that it's a gasket but made to handle 1,300° without melting. Permatex RTV-type gasket makers give up the ghost at around 500° or 600°, so they won't do the job. I'd contact Bob at DieselSite or David at Diesel Manor and ask them. Maybe some sort of a gasket material available at auto parts stores you could use to make your own?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
577 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
We have gasket material at my work, I'll check the heat rating on it.

Thanks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,119 Posts
I believe that gasket is actually made of asbestos, they are soft and feel like fiberglass cloth. I sincerely doubt you'll find a sealer at your shop to take those kinds of temps, and not burn up within ten minutes. If ya do, lemme know I want some lol.

Call any of the sponsors on this board they can probably find ya an extra gasket laying around...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
577 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I work at Aisin Brake & Chassis, we have ovens that bake an adhesive on the back of brake shoes to the shoe rim. Internals get pretty hot, 1200...I dont know. I do know we have gasket material for them. I work in the department that works on the machines, but I'm unsure of the exact rating of the material.

I emailed Autometer and maybe...just maybe they are in the feeling jolly mood and send me one for free.:deal:
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top