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Ever since I got my 05' F250 a few years ago, I've noticed that it pulls to the right pretty good when I get on the brakes hard. I finally got tired of it, and dug into the problem last weekend. The pads were shot, and so were the rotors.....so I replaced everything. The caliper pins all slid back and forth easily, but I re-greased them anyway. I cleaned the groves that the pads sat in, and installed new retaining clips. Just for the heck of it, I also bled the lines and topped everything off with fresh fluid. I put it all back together.......and I think it's doing it worse than is was before.

I have to counter steer pretty hard to keep the truck going straight when I get on the brakes. As soon as I let off the brake, the truck goes straight again.

At this point, the only thing I can think of would be that the left (drivers side) caliper is sticking, and not squeezing as hard as the right side....causing the truck to pull right. OR...maybe the front brake like on the left said is expanding more than the right side....causing more pressure to go to the right side...pulling the truck right?

Any way to test stuff out before I just start replacing parts? Anything else it could be?

The truck has 225,000 miles on it...and as far as I know, original calipers and lines.

Thanks for the help!
 

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Stop replacing parts, and don't open the hydraulic system below the reservoir unless absolutely necessary. Ford recommends NOT bleeding the brakes when replacing the pads. To change the fluid: use a squeeze bulb to empty the reservoir before beginning any brake work. Then compress all 4 calipers to return all their fluid to the reservoir, and remove that. When the brake works is done, re-fill the reservoir with the correct fluid from a sealed bottle, pump the pedal to expand the pistons (do NOT allow the reservoir to get low), and top up the reservoir to the fill line.

There are many possible reasons for brake pull. The most-common are sticking drum brake autoadjusters (which your truck probably doesn't have) or stuck e-brake cables.

If you can't find the cause, any decent alignment shop should be able to. Put your location in your profile so it shows under your username, and you might get some local recommendations.
 

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I would say complete opposite! You should replace the calipers. I have had several pucks stick after doing a pad replacement, so now I always replace the caliper when I do a brake job. BUT!! At this point I would agree with Steve83 and get the alignment checked first. If that does not help start with new calipers.
DENNY
 

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I would check the calipers. If you live in the snow belt than rust on the piston will be a problem. Also check the rubber lines and make sure they are good. I have seen them plug up with rubber from the inside of the hose. I bleed my brakes with a power bleeder. I use a turkey baster to remove as much brake fluid as i can. Fill with new fluid then bleed them. Here is where I got mine. Great tool https://www.motiveproducts.com/
 

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Replace the rubber brake lines going to the calipers. The inner hose will sometimes collapse when the get old. If that doesn't fix it, then replace the calipers. The hoses are cheaper, so replace them first. Brakes 101.
 

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(throw part$ at it for no particular reason) If that doesn't fix it...
...you'll have wasted that time & money, and probably create new problems, including having inferior replacement parts on your truck.
 

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...you'll have wasted that time & money, and probably create new problems, including having inferior replacement parts on your truck.
From the guy who says, "The most-common are sticking drum brake autoadjusters ", when drum brakes haven't been installed on the front of a truck since like 1967. And somehow thinks that alignment will cure a pull that only occurs when the brakes are applied.....
 

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The calipers ride on bolts that I like to replace even if they look good. I recommend checking those. They should be lubricated (in my world).

I had one set that was gunked and corroded. That time in my trucks history, the brakes pulled badly.

I have replaced the passenger side front four times in 11 years. I got the original from O'Reilly and they have stood behind lifetime replacements.

All of the calipers have been replaced multiple times. I blame Wisconsin salt.
 

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...drum brakes haven't been installed on the front of a truck since like 1967. And somehow thinks that alignment will cure a pull that only occurs when the brakes are applied.....
From the guy who thinks that a brake pull can only come from the front, and who can't tell the difference between an "alignment" and an "alignment SHOP".
 

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Well Steve, you're the one who takes brake problems to the alignment SHOP, not me. Where do you get your fuel filters changed, the upholstery shop? LOL!!
 

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No, I'm the guy who's Ford & ASE certified to fix brake problems, and do alignments, and change fuel filters; and the guy who knows that not everyone who asks questions on the interwebz has those certifications. So for someone who can't diagnose a brake pull himself, an alignment shop is a likely place to find someone local who can, for less money than a dealership would charge.

But I guess you know better, with all your "rig of the month" certifications. I guess you think he should change his brake pedal & steering wheel, too, right?
 
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