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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My U-joints are original at 147K miles so I am going to replace the one at the rear axle when I grease the spline of the driveshaft. It has no indication of going bad but that seems like alot of miles.

Would you guys stick with Ford Motorcraft from Ford :ford: which are non-greaseable.

Or go after-market?

NAPA carries some Spicer U-joints but not for my application according to their website. They only carry NAPA brand...any idea who manufactures these that are greaseable:

NAPA AUTO PARTS

Or would you go with Precision brand from O'Reilly which are also greaseable?

Thanks
 

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Definitely want aftermarket. Napa carries or mine does anyway, Pecision as well as SKF and Timpkin. SKF and Timpkin are doing the China thing as well as Mexico. I'm sporting Precision on axl u joints in front axle and rear driveshaft as well as their ball joints.
Make sure you are marking yoke orientation and spline line up on driveshaft.
The double Cardin can be fun. Figure out where to position joint so the yoke is opened some so you will have access to the fitting with a grease gun AND the grease fitting hole will be on one side of the joint not centered, so you need to keep an eye on that as well.
 

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This will allow you to rest it on that back plate and the pipe is the support to the yoke that is not flat. The hole allows the cap to pass thru.
These are monster u joints. When they break free tons of stored energy is going to cut loose BAM.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Definitely want aftermarket. Napa carries or mine does anyway, Pecision as well as SKF and Timpkin. SKF and Timpkin are doing the China thing as well as Mexico. I'm sporting Precision on axl u joints in front axle and rear driveshaft as well as their ball joints.
Make sure you are marking yoke orientation and spline line up on driveshaft.
The double Cardin can be fun. Figure out where to position joint so the yoke is opened some so you will have access to the fitting with a grease gun AND the grease fitting hole will be on one side of the joint not centered, so you need to keep an eye on that as well.
Nick,

Thanks for your post.

I already took the paint pen to the shaft and yoke to mark orientation.

PB Blaster for past 24 hours.

I also ordered 4 new 8mm bolts and I will use the blue threadlocker.

And I know what you mean about the placement of that zerk ;-)

Thanks:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
This will allow you to rest it on that back plate and the pipe is the support to the yoke that is not flat. The hole allows the cap to pass thru.
These are monster u joints. When they break free tons of stored energy is going to cut loose BAM.
That is really helpful and a good warning.

Thanks very much.
 

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No problem. It gets a little confusing on the double Cardin if you have one. Keep spraying.
Heat will help but watch that as well, too much things will bend. Watch the pushing angle or it will bind.
They need big big pressure. You only have one set of eyes. Just stay clear of the whole pressing area. U joints that size and age are no joke when they do pop.
 

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The non greasable OE style joints are the best. They are also available from aftermarket sources but usually aren't any less expensive than buying them from Ford.
 

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It was announced a while ago that Federal-Mogul will stop selling u-joints under the Precision name and just sell them as Moog. We just have to wait for stock depletion or at some point the salesmen to go into stores and rebox.

Non-greaseable u-joints have often been considered stronger as they don't have a weakening grease ports and hole for the zerk. Engineering wise the ports are not an issue but the zerk hole certainly is.
 

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Non-greaseable u-joints have often been considered stronger as they don't have a weakening grease ports and hole for the zerk. Engineering wise the ports are not an issue but the zerk hole certainly is.
The cap seal appears to be better quality on the non-greasable ones I've looked at too.

Also, I believe the OE joint is a forged unit. I'm not sure that is true with all the aftermarket brands.
 

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The cap seal appears to be better quality on the non-greasable ones I've looked at too.

Also, I believe the OE joint is a forged unit. I'm not sure that is true with all the aftermarket brands.
The cap seal has to be since it's not relying on new grease pushing out any water or dust.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
As I mentioned above FORD has recommended two different greases for the driveshaft "slip yoke".

One type of grease (5L3Z-19A506-A) is packaged in a single-use syringe and has a Calcium Carbonate thickener (not lithium) and this small 10-grams cost $5 retail.

The second type (XG-8) is an 85-gram squeeze tube and it is a lithium based thickener with PTFE (Teflon) which retails for $8 (thats 80% cheaper).

Here is a link to an excellent article that explains the difference between types of grease. After reading about the characteristics of the two thickeners, I have decided the smaller calcium carbonate (aka calcium sulfanate) based grease is the best for my application. It is more water resistant and it has larger particles which will help to fill the "slop" created with the erosion of the teflon coating.

Choosing a Multi-Purpose Grease: Lithium Complex or Calcium Sulfonate?

Excerpt from the link:
"Calcium-sulfonate greases exhibit superior mechanical and shear stability compared to lithium-complex greases, indicating less leakage and run-out during operation. The dropping point and high-temperature life of calcium-sulfonate greases are also better, allowing these greases to be used at higher temperatures.

Unlike lithium-complex greases, which need a significant amount of antimony-zinc or other types of additives, calcium-sulfonate thickeners have inherent extreme-pressure and anti-wear properties. In addition, while sulfonates are known to be natural rust inhibitors, lithium-complex greases invariably need rust-inhibiting additives.

Furthermore, calcium sulfonate, by virtue of its thickener property, provides excellent water-resistance properties and does not break down even in the presence of water. To improve their water-resistance properties, lithium-complex greases usually require tackifiers, which are prone to deplete quickly in the presence of water. Calcium-sulfonate greases are also compatible with lithium and lithium-complex greases.

The only limitations with calcium-sulfonate greases are their inferior pumpability and cost. "
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
8-mm Bolts

If any of your 8mm bolts holding the U-joint need replacing, the FORD P/N is F81Z-4N272-AA and they are 1.50/each.

NAPA sells a kit with all (4) bolts and (2) brackets for $7.
Its called a "U-joint strap kit" PUJ-33110.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The non greasable OE style joints are the best. They are also available from aftermarket sources but usually aren't any less expensive than buying them from Ford.
I did install the OE style U-joint (non-zerk) from AutoNation :ford:

It appeared to weigh slightly more than the NAPA brand with grease zerk and the build quality was excellent. The cap was more HD. I figured the first u-joint was still functional at 145K miles and it lacked a zerk.

Had a heck of time pressing it in with the ball joint C-clamp press. Next time I will leave it in the freezer overnight.
 
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