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Discussion Starter #1
Here's my scenario:

Yesterday, I sprayed my engine bay and valley (2000 7.3) with degreaser then sprayed it down with a water hose. Never ran it. Came out today and started it. Ran fine then started idling funny. I shut it off noticing the check engine light on. I check to see if something is unplugged to no avail. Now it starts up and runs fine until the glow plugs click off. Then it starts running like it's out of diesel or like there's water in the system. I know there's no water in or before the fuel bowl because I don't have the water in fuel light on. Is there a way to drain the fuel rails? Or would letting it sit for a few days dry it out? Plug the block in and turn the torpedo heater on it? Somebody help me please!
 

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White '99.5 F250 SD XLT 4x2, 7.3PSD, 6spd, SuperCab, Short Bed - purchased Oct'05
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I would start like this...making sure no water has infiltrated. Spray down with alcohol to clean and evaporate water.

-R&R CPS connector.

-inspect driver's engine harness as it wraps around valve cover. If not already done, wrap with non conductor to keep away from valve cover.

-inspect valve cover gasket harness connectors.

-inspect underhood fuse block.
 

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If you have leaf blower try to blow dry the alternator, distributor or where water may sit still.
Good suggestion but I wouldn't waste much time looking for the distributor:LOL:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I would start like this...making sure no water has infiltrated. Spray down with alcohol to clean and evaporate water.

-R&R CPS connector.

-inspect driver's engine harness as it wraps around valve cover. If not already done, wrap with non conductor to keep away from valve cover.

-inspect valve cover gasket harness connectors.

-inspect underwood fuse block.
Thanks for the reply. I'll check in the morning. But any insight on why it would run good while the glow plugs are still on, for a minute or so after start up? I have an indicator light that illuminates when the glow plugs are activated. The light goes off when the glow plugs click off. As soon as the light goes out, the truck starts running like water is in the system. Is it possible that the glow plugs are dispersing the water allowing the truck to run smoothly, and once they shut off the water hits the injectors and creates the out of fuel/ water in fuel symptoms?
 

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There is no way for water to be “in the system” or in your fuel by spraying the valley with a low pressure garden hose.

Assuming you did not have any parts removed when you sprayed.

One or more of your electrical connectors probably has water or moisture in it. As was suggested above, you can inspect these connectors or just dry them off with compressed air and/or spray some electrical cleaner or even fast drying brake cleaner into them and let it evaporate.

WD-40 is great at displacing water but it evaporates very slowly and is not good for electrical connections as a result.

The leaf blower is an interesting and creative solution but may not reach into the connectors entirely.

Also follow the suggestion about the wire bundle over the driver side VC. A good visual inspection for exposed wires and then protect it from chafing.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
If you have leaf blower try to blow dry the alternator, distributor or where water may sit still.
There is no way for water to be “in the system” or in your fuel by spraying the valley with a low pressure garden hose.

Assuming you did not have any parts removed when you sprayed.

One or more of your electrical connectors probably has water or moisture in it. As was suggested above, you can inspect these connectors or just dry them off with compressed air and/or spray some electrical cleaner or even fast drying brake cleaner into them and let it evaporate.

WD-40 is great at displacing water but it evaporates very slowly and is not good for electrical connections as a result.

The leaf blower is an interesting and creative solution but may not reach into the connectors entirely.

Also follow the suggestion about the wire bundle over the driver side VC. A good visual inspection for exposed wires and then protect it from chafing.
Thanks I appreciate your descriptive advise! I will update this post with my progress! I also sprayed a little more than just the valley. My objective was to spray off all the oil residue, so I could run the truck and inspect for the actual leaks, before I remove everything that can leak. I've already removed the engine and replaced the oil pan and rear main seal, as well as rebuilt the turbo 2 years ago. I know I need to reseat the turbo pedestal because it leaks but I just want to fix it all once and for all. This is a 1 ton dump truck I use for my tree and landscape service. I have to park on the road, or quickly hop out and put card board underneath the truck so I don't leak all over customers driveway and end up not getting paid. When I bought this truck, I knew nothing about diesel engines, and had minimal mechanical skills. Now i know the 7.3 well and have $1k in parts for the front end in my living room, and have $2k in parts to fix the leaks and some 7.3 mods from riffraff to make it run better in a shopping cart, ready to purchase once I identify the leaks. I have Emextensive hours and hours watching videos and reading forums researching this truck, let alone countless hours working on this truck, and now this bs! I just want to get in my truck, it go down the road straight and not leak lol
 

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I did the exact same thing once, Started the truck to let it dry off etc Got about 2 miles down the road started a bucking and kicking and check engine light kicked on, ran the codes CPS came back as the issue, replaced it and still had the same issue, replace the CPS pigtail and all was good. I probably won’t do that anymore, now I just Kinda use a air chuck and some rags and clean it up using some degreaser sprayed here and there, I made a trend on it as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks I appreciate your descriptive advise! I will update this post with my progress!
I did the exact same thing once, Started the truck to let it dry off etc Got about 2 miles down the road started a bucking and kicking and check engine light kicked on, ran the codes CPS came back as the issue, replaced it and still had the same issue, replace the CPS pigtail and all was good. I probably won’t do that anymore, now I just Kinda use a air chuck and some rags and clean it up using some degreaser sprayed here and there, I made a trend on it as well.
Thanks I'll change the pigtail tomorrow
 

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Thanks I'll change the pigtail tomorrow

Yep. Thanks you so much my good man! I went out 2 nights ago after reading your post, and put my pigtail inside a sandwich bag of rice! Yesterday morning it fired up and has run fine. I hauled my stump grinder 100 miles yesterday back and forth from a jobsite and all is well. I'm happy for the people that wash there engine bay and have the same issue in the future because they now have a forum with some help.
 

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Yep. Thanks you so much my good man! I went out 2 nights ago after reading your post, and put my pigtail inside a sandwich bag of rice! Yesterday morning it fired up and has run fine. I hauled my stump grinder 100 miles yesterday back and forth from a jobsite and all is well. I'm happy for the people that wash there engine bay and have the same issue in the future because they now have a forum with some help.
Excellent, I know I was about to pull my hair out when I did it!
 

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There is a rattle can product called Corrosion X HD that the RC community uses for waterproofing gear in RC boats or other gear that will see wet, even salt water conditions. Spray problem connectors down with it and it will dissolve corrosion and make a hydrophobic barrier for the future. Don't use too much, it is messy, like honey that has turned to sugar, sticky and drippy. Oh, and it's non conductive.
 

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Guys,
Mechanics have been dealing with this kind of thing for quite a few years.
A quick and non-messy solution is to just pull connections apart and let them airdry or a quick shot of electrical cleaner and a dab of di-electric grease.

Lets not start posting about re-inventing the wheel with less efficient home remedies.
 
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Steve83,
Although I understand the correction/clarification you make and its important to explain the difference, I think di-electric grease is a safer choice for most owners. I should have been more specific in my post above and said, “well placed” dab of di-electric grease.

Many years ago, I had direct experience with the problems non-conductive di-electric grease can cause. I was attempting to prepare my vehicle for Juneau winter weather and just carelessly slathered it into the connections like I would do on fishing boats. The problem was the various sensors on my Audi had many circuits (multi-pin) in a single connector and the di-electric created enough impedance to these multiple connections that it prevented the car from starting. I had to clean the grease off with electronic cleaner and far more carefully re-apply the di-electric grease to the connector seals and the plastic housings that slide into each other. I probably could have gotten a small bit of it on the mating conductive surfaces (pins) and the pressure of the connection would have pushed it out and still closed the circuit...but I have been cautious ever since.

Here is my concern with electrical or conductive greases in that same situation. Rather than impeding any & all current at the connector, conductive grease would have criss-crossed and swapped currents between each individual circuit (pin). I can’t swear to it but I think that would have created more problems with the various sensors, etc..

Conductive grease is excellent for connections as you have shown, but only with techs that are knowledgable and well instructed with the risks.
Non-conductive di-electric grease is safer (less damaging) in the hands of DIY’ers and the uneducated (like I was).
 

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