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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering. Why are the OE wheel studs on my 94 sooo long? I'm looking for some shorter ones online but there is nothing but the same length as mine. I was looking at them tonight, the front ones could be 1/2" shorter and the back ones 1" shorter and still have plenty of thread sticking out. I am thinking maybe I will buy a set and have them machined down to the length I want them unless there is a really good purpose and they really need to be this long.
 

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Just the way they are.
Is it a dually?

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

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In heavy truck and equipment our shop parts room stocked a bin of most but not all sizes and lengths of studs. I don't know why you can't find the length you want at any decent parts house. They're even offered SAE fine threads on one end and Standard on the other.
I am thinking maybe I will buy a set and have them machined down to the length I want
You can do like with any bolt, cut them with a hacksaw then taper the sharp end with a bench grinder.
 

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You need to look for the actual wheel stud with the size threads and pitch, I have forgotten just what ours are and not tell them that you want them for a "Ford".
 

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It is a lot easier for Ford to stock one stud for all the versions of the truck so that stud would have to work on F250 SRW up to F350 DRW covering everything from all steel to all aluminum rims. So if you stacked two Aluminum rims on the stud it would still work. If you look hard you will see other small stuff that they put on every truck because it is easier on the assembly line.
DENNY
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Thanks guys, I've talked to other people who said if those were the bolts they were made with, I shouldn't use anything else but just from common sense when it comes to bolts and nuts I figured that didn't make sense.:smile2: Does anyone make stainless steel wheel studs?
 

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I wouldn't advise using stainless for wheel studs, because stainless tends to gauld when it finds a piece of dirt, or some heat it doesn't like. When it gaulds it locks up solid, and the only way to get the nut off is to break the bolt, or cut it off. Personally I would MUCH rather deal with the extra long studs, and I don't like them either. Sometimes just a little extra stress can cause stainless to lock up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I wouldn't advise using stainless for wheel studs, because stainless tends to gauld when it finds a piece of dirt, or some heat it doesn't like. When it gaulds it locks up solid, and the only way to get the nut off is to break the bolt, or cut it off. Personally I would MUCH rather deal with the extra long studs, and I don't like them either. Sometimes just a little extra stress can cause stainless to lock up.
I did a lot of searching for them today and never ran into any stainless, probably because of the problems you talked about. Never could find the size I wanted so I'm getting the full set from Advance this week and will have a local machinist I know trim them back a little. Thx! :laugh2:
 

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You know, I've never seen any grade 8+ hardware that is stainless....
Probably a reason behind it.

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I am not sure about the trucks prior to 95 but what is the material that the front studs are made out of? I know that on my 96 that while the rears have a nice rust on them the fronts look factory fresh after 20 years.
 

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I've talked to other people.........
And their qualifications were? From pickups on up to semi tractors wheel studs are neither stainless or of grade 8 hardness.
 

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I am not sure about the trucks prior to 95 but what is the material that the front studs are made out of? I know that on my 96 that while the rears have a nice rust on them the fronts look factory fresh after 20 years.
They might be a low grade stainless alloy. On my '96 they were so rusted on, that I broke a big four way lug wrench taking them off. I was sure cussing he nice person who forgot to use antisieze.
 

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They might be a low grade stainless alloy. On my '96 they were so rusted on, that I broke a big four way lug wrench taking them off. I was sure cussing he nice person who forgot to use antisieze.
Which brings up another point. (While I did a quick search on stainless studs) It seems not recommended to use anti seize on wheel studs. As factory doesn't use any, and the torque they give is dry torque.

I'm not saying don't use it. Just something interesting I saw. Lol

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Don't use antiseize. My 1997 studs are rusty as an old 1962 Dodge, but never one bit of problem with lugnut removal, and the extra length hurts nothing. All torque ratings are for dry threads, and you will never see antiseize recommended on studs. I've never actually seen it recommended period by any service manual.
 

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I always figgered that keeping just long ones on hand allowed them to have a size that would fit for more different models.

> have them machined down to the length I want

I'd just cut em off with an angle grinder & metal cutoff wheel. A bench grinder is good, or you can just use a file, to dress the raw sharp end so the threads will work again. It isn't very critical a cut.
 

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Don't use antiseize. My 1997 studs are rusty as an old 1962 Dodge, but never one bit of problem with lugnut removal, and the extra length hurts nothing. All torque ratings are for dry threads, and you will never see antiseize recommended on studs. I've never actually seen it recommended period by any service manual.
Obviously you never worked in a truck shop, especially in snow country. For 25+ years 12 or more of us heavy truck mechanics never put a wheel back on anything from semi's on down to pickups without using anti-sieze. Just because something is not in a manual doesn't mean it's not done or recommended. I've done the same with my own pickups for decades. When a 1" drive impact won't loosen one of those huge lugnuts it will make a believer out of you.
 

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Didn't see any mention on how to replace the studs.

When you replace them, press, hammer or draw them in, line up the stud splines with the old serrations, just rotate them until they kind of click in, then press, hammer or draw them in. If you don't do it like that, it's possible to strip out the serrations if you over torque them or even loosening a rusted or over torqued stud.
 

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And if you're smart you ALWAYS use NeverSeize on the serrations/splines. They'll draw in much easier and they actually can be removed in the future if necessary.
 

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You need to look for the actual wheel stud with the size threads and pitch, I have forgotten just what ours are...
This chart shows most of them:

Does anyone make stainless steel wheel studs?
Probably, but I wouldn't want them. Stainless is a softer, weaker alloy than common steel. The black coating on hardened wheel studs is more corrosion-resistant than most types of stainless steel.
...forgot to use antisieze.
Good. They shouldn't have any.
Just because something is not in a manual doesn't mean it's not done or recommended.
There are a lot of things not in the manual that are done - that doesn't mean they SHOULD be done. And just because you don't have a manual (or you haven't read it) doesn't mean it's recommended. The manual recommends AGAINST it, several times.
Flange Area

Corrosion buildup can result in wheels sticking to the brake drum or front disc brake rotor flange after extensive service. To prevent this from recurring once the wheel and tire assembly is removed, use the following procedure.

Clean brake drum or front disc brake rotor flange and wheel bore of corrosion with wire brush, steel wool or other suitable material.

Coat wheel bore with Disc Brake Caliper Slide Grease D7AZ-19590-A or equivalent meeting Ford specification ESA-M1C172-A. Do not apply grease to wheel hub bolt nut seats or lug bolts (1107).

Install wheel and tire assembly on vehicle and tighten lug nuts to specification listed at end of this section.
Torque Specifications Description Nm Lb-Ft
5-Lug Wheel, 1/2-20, F-150, Bronco 100-180 74-133
8-Lug Wheel, 9/16-18, F-250, F-350 170-230 126-170
10-Lug Wheel, 9/16-18, F-Super Duty 170-230 126-170

NOTE: Torque specifications are for clean, dirt- and paint-free, dry bolt and nut threads. Never use oil or grease on studs or nuts.
Like you said: it's done. But if a wheel comes off and hits a busload of blind orphan nuns, I don't want to try to explain to their lawyers why I did something that Ford (and every other vehicle mfr.) says not to do. I'd like even less to explain it to my own relatives at my family's funeral.
 
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