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Discussion Starter #1
I drive a 2002 F-350 diesel and carry a 60" Hi-Lift jack. Hi-Lifts largest jack.
When used to lift off the front bumper(Diesel engines are heavy) this jack is almost useless, or dangerous to use. I weigh 185lbs and find myself actually suspended off the ground While pushing the jack handle down to lift the truck.
I know a hydraulic bottle jack would be easier to use but with the ground clearance even at stock height I would need quite a few blocks under the jack to reach the frame.
What have you done to get around this dilema?
 

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Did you sand smooth the rails then put a light coat of grease on it, this is a must do to make them work!!!. Make a extension handle that slides over the stock one out of pipe..really helps

Cary
 

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I use a 3 ton Floor jack.... anything else is just useless. I don't think that these bumpers are designed to hold the weight of that monster motor. I would be darn right afraid to use a bumper jack to lift these things up... and once up are you really taking a tire off with it up on this hi-lift? Yep it is getting close to Halloween that scares me more then Freddy Kruger.
 

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I'm an offroader so my "normal" inventory is probably not typical. But, I carry two 48" hi-lifts, two 10T bottle jacks, a small collapseable floor jack and a couple blocks. With these items, there should never be an issue with not being able to jack up the truck.

Yes, you should never jack directly on the bumper; good way to hurt yourself. you can hi-lift on the towhooks, or on the receiver, for which I carry a special receiver block that has a clevis in it, the hilift jack point will fit in the clevis.

I also have a 15k winch on the truck, so jacking to unstick myself is generally not an issue. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif
 

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Discussion Starter #5
OK, so I either have to lug around a 3 ton floor jack, or carry five jacks and three railroad ties.
If I'm stuck with a flat while away 40 miles from anywhere I guess a bottle jack and blocks might be the safest alternative.
 

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a bottle jack and a block or two is hard to go wrong with. only thing to worry about is sometimes when you have a bad flat, there may not be enough room to fit the bottle jack under the lift point. I've had that happen before, a long time ago. I could get a jack underneath but couldn't get enough on it to get the spare on and couldn't fit the big bottle underneath for more. Eventually, someone stopped that had a small jack and working together with my small jack, I was able to work the truck up enough. So, be careful with the tall bottle jacks, it's good to have a backup as well and several blocks.
 

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I used to use the stock screw jack, but hated it. I now have a 12 ton bottle jack for use on the road. Has screw extension and I keep a 12" square piece of plywood as a base.

Recently purchased a used 4 ton Walker floor jack. Only needed to tighten up the packing. Jack is at least early 1960's but holds the load and doesn't leak. Love to go the 4 ton Milwaukee, but not willing to spend $1K+ unless I can find a used one. I always use stands as a back up.

I refuse to use import floor jacks, no matter what the rating, and even with jack stands. Only exception would be the Danish Norco's, which are pretty good jack
 

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I concur with sredish. I keep on board a fair-sized bottle jack that I picked up either at Costco or Sam's Club (6- or 12-ton, marketed under Michelin's name. It's blue.... /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/shocked.gif ),
AND a much smaller version that came from some now long-ago Ford truck. The latter is just about useless other than for scaring me, but there have been times when the stout fella was just too tall.
And a bunch of blocking, too. No better blocking than chunked-up glue-lams or micro-lams or lvl's. Spendy use of wood, though....
 

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I put an 8" chain on the lift lip of the hi-jaker, then a hook on the other end. I can hok it under the bumber or through a tow hook. That said, it weighs a bunch and takes up room. I'll only take it off road because you can do other thing swith it.

I got a 10 ton bottle at Harbor Freight for about 10 cents, lol. Hope it actually works. Also have a thing designed for 4 wheel horse trailers. A half ramp with a concave section in the middle. You drive the good tire up it and the flat hangs in the air. Its heavy plastic and rated for 5,000 lbs. I figure if the flat makes the thruck to low to the ground for the bottle, I can drive the flat tire up the ramp (about 15 inches) and then get the bottle under the frame.
 

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On edit - that bluebottle Michelin of mine claims to be a 20-ton jack.
 

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For those using an extended handle on their High-Lift jack, the handle that comes with most of them is designed to fail before reaching the weight limit of the jack. Be careful. In the fire dept. we are not permitted to use anything but the supplied handle.
 

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The handle I made slips over the stock handle part way about 50%...allowing the stocker to still fail. It just gives me a mech. advantage.

Cary
 

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Sorry, but I disagree with all the above. I found that the Chevy 3/4 ton sissor jack is by far, the best for lifting from the axle, and the safest. For one thing, it is compact when closed to get under an axle when you have a flat. Then it has a ratchet up/down that is easy to use. When I first saw one used, I went to the Chevy dealer and ordered one. By now, they should be easy to get at a junk yard. Believe me when I say that the Chevy sissir jack is so far superior to anything else, including Hi-lift, bottle or even a floor jack, you better see one in action, then you'll be a believer too.
 

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I like that idea. I know the exact one you are talking about. And to think, my neighbor donated his beater, rusty POS 3/4 ton Chebby last winter to the disabled vets and I could of taken a nice scissor jack out of it for nothin'.
 

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I would love to see a scissor jack that has a ratchet-up/down feature. That sounds terrific.
I can't envision its mechanism however.
What I like about scissor jacks is they don't creep downward...unless they have catastrophic failure, which noone would describe as creep!...but what I've detested about them is their always-goofy crank. So a ratchet mechanism would be the bees' knees.
 

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As long as I've been driving a 3/4 ton crew cab (Ford and Chevy) I've kept a Craftsman floor jack behind the back seat. I think it's rated at 2.5 tons or so. I've had a truck fall, so I'm paranoid about it.
 

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Pappy19</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Sorry, but I disagree with all the above. I found that the Chevy 3/4 ton sissor jack is by far, the best for lifting from the axle, and the safest. </div></div>

Ive heard that for a long time. Have not priced one at Chebby though. Anyone know how much?
 

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For on road use i simply carry a 5-ton bottle jack and jack under the axle. for offroad a hi-lift jack,bumper chain/hook and a 3' cheeter bar(pipe),and a few more bottle jacks.
 

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If your just talking about changing a tire in an emergency then the stock jack is quite sufficient I think. Not super easy to use, but stable and lifts high enough. It is not for "Everyday" Use, but who is going to have a flat everyday? I hope not us!

For my garage, I have a couple decent floor jacks. Neither of which will lift the complete front easily, but we shouldn't do that anyway, the differential is not made to hold the complete weight of the truck from the center,,,
 

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The sissor jack from GM can be used for anything; being stuck or a flat. The formost problem in being able to get the jack under the axle is solved with the sissor jack. The bottle jack not only is crap, but is almost impossible to get under the axle when faced with a flat or getting stuck. A floor jack is fine on a floor, but trying to place it under an axle in mud or even dirt is difficult. A sissor jack has a flat bottom and will slide even on mud. Been there done that. The GM rachet system has not been copied or surpassed by any manufactuer, so I bought one and it works...very well.(For you BTS Bubba's, it's like a Sunny better than a BTS, know what I mean?)
 
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